FOR THE ARTISTS IN US ALL

CLASS 16  -  RUBENS-ESQUE

'Rubenesque' means characteristic or reminiscent of the paintings of Rubens (1577 - 1640), especially with reference to his voluptuous female nudes.

Here, I think one needed to look at the paintings of nude women of Rubens' (and there is a large portfolio of these) and produce something inspired by those. This was the section where one could bring classical Baroque styling because Rubens was a Flemish painter of the Baroque period. (I believe there were a couple of designs in the previous section that would have been much better placed here.) However, one could take a contemporary approach to a curvy female form as well. (About ten years ago, fat women cards and sculptures were all the rage in South Africa. Do you remember them?)

I think this entry needed a certain roundedness, softness and fleshy tonality. And, it needed to be feminine too. Kim Zimmerman

 

 

FOR HISTORY LOVERS WHO KNOW THAT KEEPING IT ALIVE MEANS MAKING IT RELEVANT

 

CLASS 15 - A MODERN ROCOCO FANTASY

So, how did I know that this class would have virtually no entries? Well, in South Africa, anything that requires a lot of flowers is going to have designers scattering in all directions (unless they've got a great garden). Must say it always amuses me that people say that 'flower shows aren't flower shows unless there are a lot of flowers for the public to see and smell' but ask those same people to put up a mass (not only foliages, please!) at the next floral event and there are a million excuses! Fact is - flowers cost a lot these days and even those who grow them don't necessarily want to denude them and then have to provide for all 'flower friends' who now know they've got those beautiful roses, dahlias etc in their gardens.

For the northern hemisphere, the problem was different. You can't do anything when there is just bad weather and an abundance of ivy around - and maybe the odd bunch of tulips in Tescos. January and February is seriously not the right time for trying to get Rococo inspired, especially in times of COVID lockdown.

But this section was really asking for contemporary Rococo, so there was a lot of breathing room for the creatively inclined.

Rococo is all about curves, comfort and exoticism - and forms suggesting rocks and shells - and one can do a lot with those concepts with just draping and accessorisation (and a couple of good plant forms.

As Rococo interiors have made a comeback, there is various patterning that one could play with too. Rococo used to be all about soft pastels - but contemporary Rococo allows bolder colours but they still have to be unmuddied.

This section has only seven entries - and I thank all those who emptied their gardens and the garden's of their friends to do these works.

It has been very difficult to collate these results as each set of judges took a different approach and, thus, had quite different results. This is reflected in the winning designs. The first is very Rococo (but this sort of designing is very trendy at the moment so could be considered modern/contemporary), the second is ultra modern - an almost avant garde Rococo - and the third is a mass of glorious blooms which one could just picture on the boudoir of Marie Antoinette or a person who just loves flowers and has access to them in great abundance.

Our American adjudicator had this to say and I think it is quite relevant. She didn't feel the class was strong based on the scope of the title. She was hoping for a modern version of neo-traditional with boundaries pushed even further as enabled by the word 'Fantasy' in the title. She was looking for competitors to take risks and attempt to evolve design styles even further.

If you want to look at neo traditional work, she recommends Kiana Underwood's book, 'Tulipina'.

CONGRATULATIONS WINNERS!!       Kim Zimmerman

1ST SCHALK VAN DYK OBU SA

The Judges comments : This is an effervescent collection of botanical delights and an exploration in colour and texture. The mood is young. Such a lovely presentation of pristine plant materials is refreshing. However, the strong references to historical forms, combined with very traditional placements of flora and decorative accents, suggest a hesitancy to fully embrace the class title. (American judge)

Congratulations on a very beautiful well thought out design. Stunning use of colour and choice of plant material. Excellent photography too! (South African judges)


 

2ND LEA ROMANOWSKI CANADA

The Judges comments : A modern conceptual delight with direct references to Rococo form and fancy. Masterful placements of materials create areas of negative space and a feeling of timeless whimsy. This design has exciting applications of balance, colour, line, scale and distinction. Very well done. This is 'Rocking Rococo'! (American judge)

A very interesting modern design. However, the look and feel of Rococo is lost. Much more floral plant material is required. Also, the container is too modern for the theme. (South African judges)


3RD SUZANNE BARKER CANADA

The Judges comments : Congratulations on a beautifully taken photograph! The colour scheme and flowers are gorgeous. Attention needs to be paid to the scale of the container in comparison to the amount of flowers used. (The container is too small.). The shape of the design could have been more feminine. (South African judges)

A pink dream! A soft, harmonious monochrome palette supports an abundant presentation of pristine plant material. However, the contrasts in texture and form are insufficient to embrace the airiness and line typical of Rococo styling. (American judge)

 

OTHER ENTRIES :

DEWALD VERMAAK SA

KIM ZIMMERMAN UK

LENIE BEUKES SA

MALCOLM KITT IRELAND

 


CLASS 14  -  EGYPTOLOGY FOR THE TWENTY FIRST CENTURY

O.K - moving from the 'highs of emotion', the show now enters the 'lows of history'. And, if I know one thing about preparing candidates for the S.A.F.U. National Design Diploma or for the Judges' Examination, it is that they detest having to learn about the history of floral art. It's so boring, they all complain.

I was one of only seven who sat A level history at our school and I loved it - despite having a teacher who was one of those - 'Open the text book to page 203 and summarise the chapter, then learn it and there'll be test on Monday' types. History is the link that gives us perspective and the strange thing about history is that it really does keep repeating itself (so regularly, infact, that there's not that much to learn).

Egypt was at its zenith about 3000 years ago. However, they left an indelible mark on world in many ways. When we think of Egypt, we immediately conjure up images of The Pyramids, whether we've actually seen them, or not. Because of their love of order, geometry and predictability, the Egyptians have left a permanent mark on how we approach architecture. Their classical way of draping fabric returns in fashion again and again - as do Egyptian hieroglyphic type motifs. And where do you think the original 'smoky eye' originated? Cleopatra, perhaps?

I have included some pictures to show you Egyptian influences in contemporary architecture and fashion. The architectural pieces are of Wafi Shopping Centre in Dubai (and its interior) and the conservatory is the Muttart Botanical Garden in Edmonton, Canada. The fashions are a recent showcase of designs by The Ibrahim Amany School of Fashion.

So the relevance of Egypt is still being felt today and this is what designers needed to bring to their entries for this section. What could they take about what they know about Egypt and turn it into a contemporary piece that we could enjoy now but that we still saw as emanating from the Egyptian cultural contribution.

It was a challenge - but I think there are some really good designs in this section.  Kim Zimmerman

1ST - MADHU SHAH AUSTRALIA

The Judges comments : A fabulous design and definitely a contemporary take on the Egyptian 'Eye of Horus'. The container, with its repeated geometrical shapes, speaks to the Egyptian love of predictablity. The use of black, white, red and yellow is totally appropriate. There is good movement in this design created by the cane and the cycas and great interplay of solids and open areas. The protruding bulrushes are a 'shout out' to the Nile River and use of Egyptian plant material. This designer has realised that to get a twenty first century feel, one cannot obey all the 'Egyptian rules of static beauty'. So, he/she has kept them in the container but 'thrown caution to the wind' in the design and still created something that speaks to the title. Very well done! (South African judges)

What an exciting and clever interpretation of 'The Eye of Horus'. The rhythm in this design is outstanding. The 'tear' would be better expressed with compact plant material, not the spaced radiation of the bulrushes. (Zimbabwean judges)


 

2ND - PRITESH SHAH KENYA

The Judges comments : A very striking twenty first century procession of Egyptian styling. The use of plant materials - palms, papyrus, bulrushes and lotus lily heads is so fitting. The colours - gold, green and blue against the black background work very well indeed. The 'gold' structure in the middle of the design is very intricate and beautifully embellished with small lotus lily heads. (It almost looks like the side view of an Egyptian headdress.) The way it is positioned between two similar green placements speaks to the Egyptian love of order and symmetry. Perhaps there could have been better harmony between the centre placement and the two outer ones - just a thought - that does little to diminish an accomplished piece. (South African judges)

A highly creative and imaginative design which has been beautifully assembled. Well done! (Zimbabwean judges)


3RD ANNE DALE GBU SA

The Judges comments : This design is a contemporary take on 'The Eye of Horus' which is the ancient Egyptian symbol of protection, royal power and good health. The choice of plant materials is excellent and the way they have been embellished with turquoise and gold is very Egyptian but also very contemporary. The three structural pieces within this design recall the sense of geometry so favoured by the Egyptians. The stand is a little distracting. It would also be interesting to see this design raised a little higher - but obviously the papyrus stems would need to be longer to still reach the base. Overall, this is an exceptionally eye catching and artistic creation. Well done to the designer. (South African judges)

A very dynamic design with excellent attention to detail. A reduction in black elements would be beneficial. (Zimbabwean judges)


VERY HIGHLY COMMENDED - PAULA MONK KZNAFA SA

The Judges comments :A very polished presentation showing the static rhythms and symmetry that the Egyptians loved best. The way the palms have been presented - backed by eucalyptus bark and fronted by a fan - is very clever. Using a peacock feather as a focal point is genius. The touches of gold are apt and do not overpower the design. This is sleek and lovely and could probably grace any five star Egyptian hotel in the twenty first century. (South African judges)

An excellent design that definitely recalls the Egyptians. Very high class value. (Zimbabwean judges)


HIGHLY COMMENDED - MALCOLM KITT IRELAND

The Judges comments : A totally 'off the wall' take on 'Egyptology for the Twenty First Century' - but the title allowed this. The design is so cleverly constructed with a definite element of symmetry to all the weird and wonderful 'additional extras' (like the cat - the Egyptians loved cats, the C.Ds, the palm leaf and aniseed embellishing on the hessian structure' etc.) The blue sticks and royal blue and bright red (almost neon orange) sisal/jute mop heads add appropriate and necessary colour and make the design POP! A well thought out design with a great sense of fun which would be appreciated by twenty first century audiences. (South African judges)

A very colourful design with some interesting elements but there is some lack of cohesion caused by too many accessories. (Zimbabwean judges)


HIGHLY COMMENDED - BABSIE OOSTHUIZEN GBU SA

The Judges comments : This piece is simple, yet very contemporary and also recalls the Egyptian love of geometry, regularity and quite static rhythms. The plant material used - papyrus stems and heads and dried lotus lily heads - is extremely appropriate. Well done! (South African judges)

A very neat, striking and creative design. (Zimbabwean judges)


COMMENDED - JOY SMITH WCAFA SA

The Judges comments : A very unexpected piece. Clean, contemporary and definitely delivering Egypt into the twenty first century in a simplistic, minimalistic and geometrical way using appropriate colours and plant materials. Is the cloth in the bottom glass cube required? (South African judges)

A very clever design that has been neatly assembled. What a pity the horizontal line of blue painted dry acanthus mollis stems is too long and subsequently overbalances the tripod of papyrus stems. (Zimbabwean judges)


COMMENDED - ANNALIE VAN DEN BERG SA

The Judges comments : A lively, modern concept - not sure if it is twenty first century, however! The two containers appropriately reflect the Egyptian period and are made to work well together even though they are so different. The bulrushes and papyrus grass are excellent choices of plant material and they, together with the arum lilies, have been used to reflect the Egyptian lover of order and geometry. (The two recessed arums give the design depth and repetition.) A very pleasing design which so easily could have been given a more contemporary edge. (South African judges)

A very neatly assembled design with good class value. (Zimbabwean judges)

 

DURBAN FLORAL ART CLUB MEMBER ENTRIES

 

PAULA MONK 

OTHER ENTRIES :

ELAINE BEDFORD UK

ELSA KOLVER SA

FRED DU PREEZ SA

GLENDA ADAMS SA

LYNN DELL SA

RIFAT ABID PAKISTAN

RINA MARIA SCHEPERS SA

TERTIA DU PLESSIS SA

ZENOBIA BOSCH SA

BRENDA HOLTZHAUSEN SA

 

 

FOR THOSE FILLED WITH EMOTION

CLASS 13  -  COMPOSED WITH PASSION

I have spent hours trying to find a good image for 'Composed with Passion' but have given up and just posted a picture of passion flowers which I think are breathtaking in their complexity. (I was actually looking for Tom Hulce playing Mozart in the movie 'Amadeus' but couldn't find an appropriate picture.)

This is another small class of just eleven designs. Isn't it crazy how easily we can interpret 'Anger', yet 'Passion' is just so much harder?

What is passion? O.K. - let's rather not go there. What is 'Composed with Passion'? It is something that is made that looks like it has the hand of God in it. It is music that feels like it has come directly from heaven; it is watching an athlete who has honed his skill so that he moves with the grace of an angel; it is a painting that speaks directly to the soul; it is food that looks and tastes so wonderful that part of you doesn't want to eat it but when you do, you just can't stop. I can go on and on - but I think you get the idea.

All one had to do here was create a wonderful design that gave the judges' goosebumps. Simple, really. (NOT). Kim Zimmerman

1ST PRITESH SHAH KENYA

The Judges comments : A very well executed circular design which has been created with passion and good planning. The dominant red colour is well placed to attract attention and leads the eye to the centre of the design for visual impact. The circle seems to represent passion and endless love. The designer has chosen a variation of excellent textural contrasts. The 'curly' vine gives rhythm and depth. The design is harmonious and a pleasure to look at and enjoy. The visible leg of the stand is a little distracting but it is a good idea to lift this piece. (South African judges)


2ND LOCIA HARTZER GFU SA

The Judges comments : A well executed harmonious vertical design. The dark pink colour represents passion. The rough of the bark and the smooth anthuriums create textural contrasts. Rhythm, space and balance are created by the use of green swirls. A swirl at the right side with more volume would ensure a better balanced design. Also, the stem of the vertical design could be longer to give the eye a better upwards flow. (South African judges)

3RD VERONICA FRANCA SA

The Judges comments : A well executed vertical design with good length. The design evokes a strong Christian message of the Passion of Christ. Clever use of plant material interprets this message well. The thick spathe in the centre represents God. The well placed dominant red flowers represent God's love and the blood of His Son; the thorns represent the crown placed on Christ's head as he died for man's sins. This is a well balanced design with intricate negative spaces. Lots of rhythm is created by the flow of the red carnations and the spaces between the thorn branches that brings textural interest throughout the design. The placement of the plant materials leads the eye through the design effectively. Well done. (South African judges)


 

DURBAN FLORAL ART CLUB MEMBER ENTRIES

REHANA ALLY 

 

OTHER ENTRIES

BUSHRA MAQSOOD PAKISTAN

FARRAH AZAM PAKISTAN

 

LENIE BEUKES SA

LEON HEFER SA

MARTIE VAN ROOYEN SA

NASREEN ANWAR PAKISTAN

SAMIDHA ARORA KENYA

 

 

CLASS 12 -  REPRESSED ANGER

As this class has thirty entries, I'm guessing we all understand anger! (At least a lot more than we do 'Street Culture', 'Low Saturation' and 'Playfully Out of Proportion'!!)

'Anger' immediately makes us 'see red' so it is an obvious colour to bring to this interpretation. A lot of people thought about the 'textures' of anger so used thorns or other suitably rough plant materials to convey this emotion.

But, there was that word 'Repressed' to consider and there are an abundance of clever ways to bring a feeling of being 'pushed down' or 'held back' into a design as you will see in the entries in this section.

What is 'repressed anger'? It's the anger you try to hide from the world and keep inside. That feeling of wanting to want to smack someone - but you can't. And, while it's all very well to behave in a civilised manner, repressed emotions need to put themselves somewhere eventually. Especially if you're covering them up with smily face and a happy attitude too.

I hope that all of the entrants who tackled this design, got rid of a little of any repressed anger they may have had!

Enjoy the looking while the poor chap above just about explodes with his pent up emotions! Kim Zimmerman

1ST JILL HOSKIN  ECFAA  SA

The Judges comments : An outstanding interpretation and exhibit. The angry spiky line is repressed by the two ‘lips’ of spathes. Striking simplicity at its best! Very well done indeed!! (U.K. judge)

This succinct design POPS out at you for its simplicity. Less is more!

The designer so artistically encapsulated the theme within the solidness of the two palm spathes, placed in the horizontal position, creating a window of space to showcase the ‘repressed anger’ being held deep down in the unconscious. This tells the story in a remarkable way, with the use of so little in the way of material, but so cleverly chosen.

Eugenia berries placed on the vicious acacia thorns displays severe pain. On the other hand, with this type of emotion there is always softness expressed as shown in the use of the hibiscus flowers, as a stark contrast to the other forms. Perhaps these were a little light and flimsy. Unfortunately, the attachment of the palm spathe to the stand is visible and there is a noted blemish on the upper spathe. (South African judges)

LOCIA HARTZER GFU SA

The Judges comments : What a soulful and dramatic interpretation! There is a strong feeling of sinister turmoil in this design, almost of hopelessness. The presentation, against a sombre background in subdued lighting, is fabulous.

A variety of textures appear in a strong grouping effect, with shine, rough and smoothness coming through. This is enclosed, with clever placement of painted cane, giving the design rhythm, depth and strong movement.

The container and plant material combine to form a harmonious unity. A strong and clever design. Well done. (South African judges)

Dark, evil anger repressed by black rhythmic bands. One could also believe that these bands have controlled the spikes of anger so much that their intensity of colour has become repressed as well. Excellent design. (U.K. judge)


3RD ALICJA  KOWANLCZYK AUSTRALIA

The Judges comments : An excellent interpretation! The sphere form created from flowers and peppers in red really gives the feeling of anger. Also, the subtle idea that with that many chilli peppers my mouth, I would be very angry, there is a subliminal addition to the interpretation. The three layers of caging and control of the 'repression' give good rhythm to the exhibit. (U.K. judge)

The display of this design presents itself as an optical illusion giving it amazing depth. It is impressive in its minimalism and the central ‘heart’ is eye pulling and indicative of ‘repressed anger’.

The spatial element is creatively expressed. Nonetheless, the entanglement of the twisting curved branches is very clearly noted to be attached distinctively on the front portion of the frame only. The ‘fixing’ points of the branches need to be tidied up as do the cut off branch ends. The chillies could have been more evenly distributed. (South African judges)

VERY HIGHLY COMMENDED - DOROTHY VORSTER NWBU SA

The Judges comments :An extremely neat execution of a minimalistic horizontal design which features great rhythm and movement. The crossed sticks show 'confused and conflicting anger' but the spaces between them convey the feeling of having to 'repress' this. The sharp cropping of the xanadu leaves further expresses the ‘down-trodden’ feel of this strong emotion and the cohesive grouping of anthuriums adds more colour to the anger.

This piece is an harmonious whole presented in an very artistic and stylish way. Well done. (South African judges)

A well staged design. Red hot anger is being restrained by the 'cage' of red branches. (U.K. judge)

HIGHLY COMMENDED  -  ANESU MUNENGWA ZIMBABE

The Judges comments : A really strong feeling of ‘Repressed Anger' is conveyed in this piece. The red croton foliage in single leaves could have been repeated a couple more times. However, the simplicity of this design is very powerful. (U.K. judge)

The original concept, line and the use of the brilliant black and red codiaeum leaves are all ideal choices to depict ‘anger’. The contrast created between the codieaum leaves and the dried aloe, together with the spikiness of the acacia thorns create the emotion of ‘repressed anger’. However, the design could have been further developed by adding more codiaeum leaf placements to create better scale and proportion. The inclusion of red cane to create continuity and direction strengthens this design. Nevertheless, the heavy black steel frame is too dominant for the lightness of material content. The visible cable ties of the ‘fixing points’ detract merit from the neatness and finish of this design. (South African judges)


COMMENDED - NAINA SHAH KENYA

The Judges comments : A lovely exhibit. The red chillies and spiky thorns convey anger. 'Restraint' is conveyed by the plant material being partially contained in the glass vase which also gives a more decorative feel to the design. This is an alternative solution to using plant material to convey the necessary 'repression'. (U.K. judge)

Using red as the dominant colour and representing the ‘anger’ in this design, together with the collective choice of plant material displays a certain understanding of the theme. The two creative dried chilli balls display textural contrast against the smooth and shiny chillies. However, had they been incorporated within the design, they would have added much more value.

The choice of glass for this title is unfortunate as it interprets visibility and reflection. ‘Repression’ calls for non-visibility, but the glass further magnifies the plant material therein. The condition of the chillies is not pristine. The ‘repressed anger’ should be more contained and shown as ‘held down’ or ‘pushed down’ instead of appearing to be overflowing. (South African judges)


DURBAN FLORAL ART CLUB MEMBER ENTRIES 

PAULA MONK KZNAFA SA

 

 

OTHER ENTRIES 

ANGELA HEFFRON IRELAND

ANN CLIFFORD IRELAND

ANN PETERS CANADA

ARUNA SHAH KENYA

BRENDA EKSTEEN SA

CORRICE HOLMES SA

DEWALD VERMAAK SA

EWALD WESSELS SA

FAYE FENN KZNAFA SA

HANNELORE HENRY  USA

 

HUMA EHSAN PAKISTAN

JEANETTE HAVENGA SA

JOYCE WIHNAN CANADA

LEON HEFER SA

LOUISE COMBRINCK SA

MEENA SHAH KENYA

NAYDENE SMITH SA

PRITESH SHAH KENYA

 

PRIYA SHAH KENYA

RENEE VAN TONDER SA

RUBY AIJAZ PAKISTAN

SAJEELA AFZAAL PAKISTAN

SALMA ANSARI PAKISTAN

 

 

FOR 'PRINCIPLED' DESIGNERS

CLASS 11  -  PLAYFULLY OUT OF PROPORTION

This section has twelve entries probably because designers spend a lot of time trying to get scale and proportion correct in their work, that to undo all of that learning and go in the opposite direction is too contrary to many hours of teaching and discipline.

However, playing with proportion is one of the ways to create contemporary design. Those 3:5:8 classical proportions of 'so called perfection' are not what today's eye seeks - so start playing with your well established sense of proportion and you'll find new looks suddenly appearing that actually look fabulous.

This section asked for designers to get playful with their 'playful proportions' so competitors could really do something quite 'over the top' and get away with it.

Kim Zimmerman

 

1ST MICHAEL CORDEIRO AUSTRALIA

The Judges comments : There is great distortion in scale and proportion in the line and forms of this design. A less busy background and better photograph would have been a great benefit. (It needs to be said that this is not an entirely original design.) (South African judges)

The structure is out of proportion compared to the container and the daises. Beautiful 'play' has been created with the twist at the top of the design. Well done. (Kenyan judges)


2ND MALCOLM KITT IRELAND

The Judges comments : The small lemons are totally out of proportion compared to the bold container. The dried plant material on top gives a 'sparkling' effect and combined with the complementary colour scheme gives a wonderful feeling of 'play'. (Kenyan judges)

A very well staged design using a complementary colour scheme. The minimalistic approach is so appropriate for this piece. The contrasts in texture and colour are excellent but size and proportion are not distorted fully enough. More small sized yellow plant material would have created a greater feeling of 'out of proportion'. The base placement is unnecessary and distracts from an otherwise well harmonised design. (South African judges)


3RD RUPAL CHANDARIA KENYA

The Judges comments : A great playful design in complementary colours. Excellent craftsmanship is evident. The proportional distortion in line, form, space and colour creates an exciting dynamic design. Well done! (South African judges)

Excellent play, rhythm and good internal spaces have been created with the midellino sticks. The anthuriums and spheres are not in proportion with the midellino structure/s. (Kenyan judges)

 

OTHER ENTRIES

ALTHEA HIGHAM SA

ANJNA BECKRA KENYA

BHAWANI BANSAL  INDIA

GAIL TAVERNER SA

HAZEL LAING SA

KIM ZIMMERMAN SA

LEA ROMANOWSKI CANADA

RHUKSANA RATTANSEY PAKISTAN

SALMA ANSARI PAKISTAN

 

CLASS 10  -  HIGH CONTRAST, LOW SATURATION

O.K. - so I've decided that we don't have many principled designers around who are willing to take up a challenge. Both classes in the 'For Principled Designers' section were poorly supported.

Class Ten was called 'High Contrast, Low Saturation' and this is a difficult title to interpret but I believe there was one person who really did well in this class - which means it can be done!! (Oh - there are other good designs too - don't worry!)

Low saturation refers to low colour saturation and I have included some pictures below which show what low saturation looks like. All colours have to be very watered down i.e have weak chroma. You can tweak your camera to take a photograph with low saturation if all else fails. However, doing this makes achieving high sharp textural contrasts difficult. But contrast can be achieved in many other ways - by using contrasting lines and forms, for example.

Class Ten did require a lot of thought - but sometimes this makes great art. Sometimes, it doesn't though.  Kim Zimmerman

 

1ST PRITESH SHAH KENYA

The Judges comments : A very good presentation. A greater quantity of smooth elements would create even stronger contrast in this design. 'Low saturation' has been very well achieved by this exhibitor. (Zimbabwean judges)

A really exciting design with great contrasts in form and a good use of colours that are not highly saturated. The use of space and texture is very well executed. Perhaps, the echeveria need to be slightly moved to the left for absolute perfect balance! (South African judges)


2ND GLENDA ADAMS ECFFA SA

The Judges comments : Wonderful movement through space in a superb design. Excellent use of appropriate colour has been carried throughout this piece. The forward curving piece of ‘stressed’ wood, though very exciting, is quite dominant and the echeveria rather small in comparison. Very neat mechanics have been used throughout this design. (South African judges)

A lovely sense of rhythm is displayed in the “pony tail” of grasses. However, more visual weight is required in the top placement of echeveria. (Zimbabwean judges)


3RD  -  KATHLEEN POTTON WCAFA SA

The Judges comments : A superb design of mixed textures and a low saturated colour landscape that perfectly fits the title. A great piece of artistry. (South African judges)

An interesting and creative design but there is very little contrast shown between elements. (Zimbabwean judges)


DURBAN FLORAL ART CLUB MEMBER ENTRIES

COGIE THAVARAYAN KZNAFA SA

 

 OTHER ENTRIES

FARIDA KALIM PAKISTAN

KIM ZIMMERMAN UK

LEA ROMANOWSKI CANADA

LORRAINE ROSE   SA

TABASSAM RIZVI PAKISTAN

 

 

FOR LOVERS OF CONTEMPORARY COLOUR

 

CLASS 9  -  STREET CULTURE

This class had a paltry seven entries and this is probably because most of us, if we are totally honest with ourselves, live in lovely suburban enclaves and have little idea of what 'Street Culture' is all about and how much it influences our lives in insidious ways.

'Street Culture' is everywhere in densely populated urban areas, especially where people are having to hustle to make ends meet. These are the savvy souls who know how to get the most for the least and who 'have contacts who have contacts' who can get them 'a something' and you don't want to ask how legal the process is. These people speak their own lingo, dance to their own music, make their own art, create their own fashion and entertain themselves where there is often high risk involved.

And while we may shudder at all of this - guess where the newest fashions, the coolest slang and the most trendy cuisine comes from - the street, my brother!

So, this section was interesting in that it produced some very diverse work - from graffiti, to market culture, to a desolate street of an old manufacturing town to a very graphic piece which represents what it must be like to live on streets where drugs and violence are everyday.

This section was not about producing chocolate box flower designs - this section was about grit and how things are tough for a lot of people. If we want floral to be art, it doesn't have to be pretty, it's got to sometimes 'pack a punch' and just be meaningful.  Kim Zimmerman


1ST - GEETA SHAH KENYA

The Judges comments : A colourful exhibit depicting graffiti. The flat profiles of painted dried fan palm at the left and right periphery visually impede the rhythmic effect of the rest of the components. The stargazer lilies and baubles are too decorative for an interpretation of graffiti. A pleasing exhibit but not daring or dynamic enough for the theme. (Kenyan judges)

This is a superb design with plenty of rhythm, pattern, form and bright colours that have strong 'street culture' characteristics. The big bold brush strokes suggest, ‘I own this wall’. Beware of visible mechanics like cut off ends of wire. When using baubles, make sure the 'open tops' are not visible. In this design, all components speak so well to the theme which makes it exciting to look at. (South African judges)


2ND - LEA ROMANOWSKI CANADA

The Judges comments : Superbly angled and positioned heliconias create a 'hiphop' vibe. Touches of colour thereon tie in with the graffiti aspect of street culture. The metal strips perhaps suggest rollerblades or at least an urban environment and enhance the design and interpretation. The concept is understated yet highly effective. Well done! (Kenyan judges)

A strong design that is a bit too sophisticated; unlike street culture, that is informal, colourful and has plenty of movement. The strong purple and orange colour of the beautiful heliconia is very striking, but adding some more vivid or even neon colours and components with strong movement and rhythm would have given the design more of a 'street vibe' and better class value. The design is very neat and has been well staged. (South African judges)


3RD  -  HARSHIDA SHAH KENYA

The Judges comments : A vibrant urban street culture design. Bright colours and crosshatched lines have been used to good effect. The design would have been more striking and interpretive had the designer only used geometric lines and shapes and less recognisable plant materials. That being said, there is good contrast between the strong diagonal lines and the curled lines of the kelp and the blue dried strelitzia leaves that give wonderful movement. A piece of silver pipe, which is part of the stand, is protruding at the top right-hand side and detracts from the strong diagonal line. (South African judges)

A competent attempt to depict graffiti. The fences of dried yucca leaves need to be more vividly coloured with more space between each leaf, and positioned higher on to the screen to enable the top one to project further out to the left at a more dynamic angle for excitement of interpretation. The placement of dried anthurium leaves, bromeliad spikes and burgundy foliage at the left not only emerges as a separate design but also creates heaviness and imbalance. It is unconnected to the theme. (Kenyan judges)


HIGHLY COMMENDED - CRYSTAL TROJEK CANADA

The Judges comments : A restrained approach to design which is stunning in its stillness and simplicity. It makes a little speak volumes. There seems no component which can be added or eliminated. Perhaps rather too sober for ‘Street Culture’ unless a title card was included which would enlighten the judges on the intended interpretation. (Kenyan judges)

This is a very beautiful, calm design - but it does not interpret 'street culture'. It has a strong urban feel and seems to depict a deconstructed building. But, it lacks the vibrant colours and movement of 'street culture' and therefore does not have much class value. The components in this design could have been replaced with bright neon-coloured pieces and lines that have plenty of movement and rhythm. The choice of the black container and vertical lines is great and is a good starting point on which to create an effective design. (South African judges)

 

OTHER ENTRIES

JAYNA SHAH KENYA

 

MICHAEL CORDEIRO AUSTRALIA

PRIYA SHAH KENYA

 

 

CLASS 8  -  PANTONES COLOURS OF 2021 - ULTIMATE GRAY & ILLUMINATING YELLOW

(create a design to help Pantone advertise this fact)

For 2021, the United States' paint brand’s team of trend forecasters selected two shades – 'Ultimate Gray' and 'Illuminating'. This is only the second time two colours have been chosen together in the Colour of the Year’s two decade history.

Used by fashion, graphic and interior designers, the Pantone Institute’s colour matching services are a resource for predicting palettes that might prove popular with consumers. Their colour of the year choices are often contentious.

This year, the combination has been likened to the shades of 'hi-vis' vests, road markings and 'screaming sickly urban melancholy, a brutalist facade, cold sunshine and cement'. Vogue described it simply as 'really weird'.

Pantone say their choices this year reflect 'a message of happiness supported by fortitude'. But darker readings of 'Ultimate Gray', a pale shade of dove they liken to 'pebbles on the beach and natural elements', aren’t hard to come by. The track pants we’ve all been pulling on each morning; the sameness of days blurring into one another; the vinyl floors of an ICU ward.

Their second choice 'Illuminating' is a buttercup yellow, which Pantone describe as 'bright and cheerful'; 'sparkling with vivacity' and 'imbued with solar power'. It is the first time in over a decade a shade of yellow has been chosen. In 2009, when they selected a warmer yellow, 'Mimosa', they said, 'No other colour expresses hope and reassurance more than yellow'. A lot may have changed in ten years, but it seems Pantone’s interpretation of yellow has not. Kim Zimmerman

 

1ST  -  ANJNA BECHRA KENYA

The Judges comments : A beautifully presented, rhythmic exhibit. All components are well displayed and placed to create maximum perspective. The use of positive and negative space has been well considered. An excellent interpretation. (U.K. judges_

A well constructed design with pleasing scale and proportion. Colours are well incorporated into the design and class value is high. Sometimes, conflicting lines interfere with the visual flow. (South African judges)

 

2ND  -  ARTI DOSHI KENYA

The Judges comments : A beautiful, well-balanced design with fabulous rhythm which depicts the class theme well. Unique use of textures and line provide a surprisingly fresh approach. (South African judges)

A carefully thought-out exhibit. Good use of proportion in colour selection with the grouped craspedia making a good focal area. There is a variety of textural interest but the top senecio leaves are rather haphazard in placement spoiling the presentation. The looped midelino sticks are a little untidily grouped. (U.K. judges)


3RD  -  BINDYA SHAH KENYA

The Judges comments : A superbly constructed and extremely well executed design. Good choice of plant materials and additional components. Illuminating yellow and ultimate grey are used with such confidence! A powerful presentation! (South African judges)

A strong contemporary exhibit with both pantone colours well used in fresh and dried plant materials. Line has been cleverly used to create various rhythmic placements, curved and straight, with space well utilized. The exhibit is a little top heavy on the right hand side where there is an over-abundance of circular shaped material. The dominant dark grey vertical grouping at the centre, splits the design into two parts making it visually unbalanced. (U.K. judges)


VERY HIGHLY COMMENDED - DI COCHIUS GFU SA

The Judges comments  :  A fascinating exhibit. Bold lines horizontally provide good rhythm. The fine plant material at the base requires a stronger grouping to improve the visual weight on the right hand side. (U.K. judges)

A gorgeous design with high class value. The use of plant material is very imaginative. It is so sad that the yellow is not correct. This is yellow-green and not illuminating yellow. (South African judges)

 

HIGHLY COMMENDED - ODETTE PAXTON WCAFA SA

The Judges comments  :  A well executed contemporary design with lots of detail. Yellow and grey are very well integrated into the design. A design with excellent class value. (South African judges)

An immaculate exhibit, beautifully staged with delightful use of textures and forms. Placing some smoother plant material lower in the design would improve the proportions and overall rhythm. (U.K. judges)


COMMENDED  -  ANESU MANENGWA ZIMBABWE

The Judges comments : Flawless concept, technique and choice of plant material. This design is very well executed in its simplicity using only the two colours required. Very good balance and depth has been achieved. (South African judges)

An imposing design. The craft work is excellent and the interlocking panels provide a true sense of perspective and depth. The line of gerberas brings the eye straight to the stand. The twirled wire brought down to the base would have provided stronger unity. (U.K. judges)


COMMENDED  -  GEETA SHAH KENYA

The Judges comments : A creative concept that has been very well executed. Unusual plant material and components are very refreshing. Unfortunately, the colour of the small leaves are not correct. (South African judges)

There is very strong use of textures throughout this exhibit. Beautifully rolled leaves and good finish to craft work is evident. Extending the yellow pods across the top of the main leaf would improve the rhythm and balance. (U.K. judges)


COMMENDED  -  SHAISTA KHAWAR PAKISTAN

The Judges comments : A very good interpretation with bold use of diagonal rhythm and clear contrast of colour and form. Incorporating a few more chrysanthemum flowers high left would enhance the overall balance and visual weight. (U.K. judges)

Well designed and executed. However, the grey is too overpowering. More yellow in the composition would have made all the difference. (South African judges)

OTHER ENTRIES

PRIYA SHAH KENYA

RINA-MARIA SCHEPERS SA

SHEILA GILBERT IRELAND

TALAT HASHIMI PAKISTAN

ALMA BADENHORST SA

AMELIA LOUBSER SA

AMNA ABBAS PAKISTAN

DIANA WEIBEL SA

EWALD WESSELS SA

GLENDA ADAMS SA

GULANDUM MOSHIN PAKISTAN

HELEN CUSACK IRELAND

JAYNA SHAH KENYA

JOANNE RACHFALOWSKI CANADA

JOY CHAPMAN SA

JOYCE WIHNAN CANADA

LEA ROMANOWSKI CANADA

MARLA CHERNOFF CANADA

MERLE CHRISTIE SA

 

NABILA SHAH PAKISTAN

NASREEN MAZRAH PAKISTAN

NIMITA SHAH KENYA

PAMELA GALLOWAY UK

PARVANA MAQSOOD PAKISTAN

 

 

 

 

FOR LOVERS OF PATTERN, SHAPE AND FORM

 

CLASS 7  -  GREEN ARCHITECTURE

'Green Architecture' was the final class in the 'For Lovers of Pattern, Shape and Form' section so hopefully the judges were still on the look out for good use of all these elements when they assessed this class.

'Green architecture' is a buzzword (I know it's two words, but you know what I mean) of the present day. Architects seek to build structures that are more in tune with the landscapes they inhabit and that are made from materials that are environmentally friendly and energy efficient. As climate change becomes a reality, structures need to made to withstand the vagaries of the weather; they need to be able to cool or warm themselves in a way that doesn't increase our carbon footprint and bring water to us that can be recycled for use in the garden.

All of this is very difficult to interpret in floral art (although a couple of our entrants did try) but what this section did require was competitors to use green and to build something architectural by using construction and structure work in their designs. Kim Zimmerman


1ST  -  MARJOLIJN MALAN WCAFA SA

The Judges comments : An excellent, artistic design and outstanding interpretation. The use of the sticks is inspired and adds to the interest and originality. The choice of colour is unconventional but works extremely well in this design. The appropriate plant material is in excellent condition. Congratulations on a wonderful design. (South African judges)

A pristine selection of green botanicals creating great impact to interpret the title. The majestic agave towers in union with the pineapple lilies and sansevieria and create good depth, balance and synchrony. The staggered wood pieces threaded unto the agave leaves is a clever mechanic as well as a decorative element creating rhythm and movement. Very well executed. Congratulations! (Pakistani judges)

2ND  -  DEWALD VERMAAK OBU SA

The Judges comments :  An innovative, clever way to depict the title. The combination of the various components and techniques make for an engaging design. However, the interpretation does not reflect the title as strongly as it could. But, well done on a different approach. (South African judges)

A well balanced rhythmical structure with a central placement of pristine green botanicals making a statement with their form and colour. The blue green circles are adding contrast and variation. The vegetables and various greens grouped give a strong focal area. (Pakistani judges)

3RD  -  BINDYA SHAH KENYA

The Judges comments :  This design has a distinctly architectural feel. Effective use has been made of modern techniques such as rolling, stacking and fencing. Colour and textural variations have been introduced to achieve a pleasing design. Tighter fencing would have prevented the material from sagging (on the left). Well done on a great effort! (South African judges)

A well-executed modern design using many techniques well. However, the repeated lines are a little monotonous. (Pakistani judges)

 

VERY HIGHLY COMMENDED  -  DIANA DE VOS WCAFA SA

The Judges comments : A very neat presentation of varied leaves thoughtfully put together to cover the structure. The close proximity of the background makes the design static because the sense of depth and dimension is lost. The two heavy leaves could have been raised much higher for better impact and good proportion. (Pakistani judges)

Floral has definitely become art in this exciting composition. Different, interesting leaf applications form the focus of this design and good use of space has been achieved. The plant material is in pristine condition and has been well managed. The colour of the base tends to distract. (South African judges)


HIGHLY COMMENDED  -  DI COCHIUS GFU SA

The Judges comments :  The structure clearly depicts 'Green Architecture' and good pattern, form and shape are evident. The design has been neatly executed. The placement of the philodendron leaves adds flair. While the interpretation is good, the design does tend to be rather heavy. (South African judges)

A highly commended, very well balanced design; the variation of leaves used in blocks creates interest. The light string beans break the harshness of the structures used. The green wire and apples draw the eye inwards and outwards. The sculptured leaves add poise to the design. (Pakistani judges)


COMMENDED - DE MARA BEZUIDENHOUT  SA

The Judges comments : Pattern, shape and form are evident in this exciting design. It has a modern feel achieved by clean lines and suitable material that is in pristine condition. However, the architectural interpretation does not come through very strongly. Well done! (South African judges)

A dynamic design with great use of the required colour - green. Clean, clear cut lines give a sculptured look. The dyed dark green moss adds textural interest to the design. Well presented. (Pakistani judges)

COMMENDED  -  LEA ROMANOWSKI CANADA

The Judges comments : An excellent interpretation of the class title. The concept is so simple yet it conveys the message of the title very well. The design is neatly executed and plant material is in good condition. Well done on an impactful idea. (South African judges)

The flax leaves with the cutouts lend an architectural effect to the design. Use of space is very good. The base could have been square or rectangular to enhance the tall structure and go with the beautiful skyscrapers. (Pakistani judges)

 

DURBAN FLORAL ART CLUB MEMBER ENTRIES

COGIE THAVARAYAN KZNAFA SA

 

VERONICA LAVOIPIERRE KZNAFA SA

 

CHERYL GRIFFITHS KZNAFA SA

 

OTHER ENTRIES

AMNA ABBAS PAKISTAN

ANETTE GOUWS SA

ANNELIE VAN DEN BERG SA

ASMA ANSARI PAKISTAN

COBUS CONRADIE SA

EWALD WESSELS WCAFA SA

GERDA STOLS SA

GHAZALA  JAVED PAKISTAN

HARASHIDA SHAH KENYA

JOAN MCBURNEY UK

KATHLEEN LANG CANADA

LANNY PRAMANA AUSTRALIA

MALGOSIA ZAPALA CANADA

 

MARGARET BREAKS UK

MICHAEL CORDEIRO AUSTRALIA

PAMELA GALLOWAY UK

PRATIBHA TEWARY KENYA

PRIYA SHAH KENYA

SUNA MALHERBE SA

SUNITA KANORIA INDIA

ZENOBIA BOSCH SA

 

CLASS 6  -  A CONTEMPORARY RADIAL DESIGN

Class Six's, 'A Contemporary Radial Design', also fell into the category of 'For Lovers of Pattern, Shape and Form'.

It required a design with a strong radial point or points and lines of radiation from this point/s for drama and emphasis.

We usually associate traditional design with a single focal area from which all lines radiate but this class wanted a contemporary design - not just a modern one!!

So there were challenges aplenty. I thought everyone would opt to create some wire 'spider webbing' and go from there but competitors had other ideas.

There were a couple of spirals - and I suppose that is radiation of a sort - but let's not get caught up in semantics. Kim Zimmerman

 

1ST - LEA ROMANOWSKI CANADA

The Judges comments : A dramatic and striking design, full of radiating angles and movement, which creates a great interpretation of the class title, without too many components used. The bent equisetum gives the design a fresh and contemporary feel. Although the container is fairly small, the black colour and placement of the cynaroides protea grounds the design which is well balanced. The white background shows up the design beautifully. Well done. (South African judges)

This minimalist design says 'contemporary'. The lower placements of the equisetum on the left and right disturb the rhythmic pattern. (Canadian judges)

2ND - COBUS CONRADIE WCAFA SA

The Judges comments : This design has strong radial movement with the excellent usage of the chamaerops palm leaves. A design with good class value has been created. The contemporary, bound ribbon circles achieve depth and interest because they have been cleverly placed. The echeveria and ovate leaves in the centre give a good change of texture and colour and this is enhanced by the pinkish tone of the palm pedicel crossing the lines of the radial movement. The background complements the design. Well done on an excellent interpretation. (South African judges)

A pristine example of a contemporary radial design. (Canadian judges)


3RD  -  KAREN FERREIRA SA

The Judges comments :  A lovely contemporary radial design with great class value. The spiral palm spathe adds weight and movement to the centre section of the design and balances the protruding radial sticks. There is a sense of energy in the design and the straight, wire bound sticks further enhance the radial effect created. The colours show up well against the black background and this also adds drama to the design. Well done. (South African judges)

This interesting design combines elements of a spiral design and a radial design. Disparate radial parts contribute to an overall lack of harmony. (Canadian judges)

COMMENDED - WIQARUNNISA BOOLANI PAKISTAN

The Judges comments : A celebratory contemporary radial design created by using two neatly strung mauve circles. The palm leaves are a good choice as the radial lines are evident in each leaf. Good depth has been created by placing the palm leaves in-between the circles and behind the back circle. The inside placement of Stargazer lilies are beautiful and further enhance the strong colour scheme. However, the palm leaves have created too many radial lines and the sticks placed on the outer circle are lost. If the palms had been cut to follow the circles, the design would have been enhanced.(South African judges)

Depth and layering is well achieved in this design. The unevenness of the radial placements on the left side disturbs the design’s balance. (Canadian judges)

DURBAN FLORAL ART CLUB MEMBER ENTRIES

ROSEMARIE BLAIR KZNAFA SA

OTHER ENTRIES

ALTHEA HIGHAM WCAFA SA

BARBARA VERITY SA

ELMIEN RAVENCROFT SA

ELSA KOLVER SA

GULANDAM MOSHIN PAKISTAN

HELEN CUSACK IRELAND

JILL HOSKIN ECFAA SA

KATHLEEN DEAN UK

MALGOSIA ZAPALA CANADA


MARIE CLAASEN SA

NAINA SHAH KENYA

PRAVINA SHAH KENYA

RAFIT ABID PAKISTAN

SALIMA FEROZ PAKISTAN

SANDRA WILLIAMSON UK

SCHALK VAN DYK OBU SA

VERONICA FRANCA SA

VIBHA DODHIA KENYA

 

CLASS 5  -  A SYNTHESIS OF FORM AND COLOUR

This class also fell into the 'For Lovers of Pattern, Shape and Form' category.

It was not a wildly popular class and only started to fill up a little once other options had run out. I think people over thought this title and didn't know how the heck they could synthesise form and colour instead of just breaking the title down and realising that they had to synthesise the shapes or forms and synthesise the colours they used- i.e. pick a form and repeat it with slight variation and pick a colour scheme and use it. There were no tricks - just separate out the two requirements.

I have included a couple of pictures by Paul Klee who worked a lot with the concept of synthesis of colour and form. In both pictures, he plays with repeated shapes (Klee was actually a draftsman). The 'red' picture is called 'Castle and Sun'. It is overwhelmingly composed of rectangles, squares, triangles and then, a single circle which obviously represents the sun. Because the red is so dominant, he can get away with the arbitrary placement of some bright yellow, blue and green without a feeling of colour disharmony creeping in.

The more achromatic and neutralised piece (called 'Three Houses and a Bridge') uses more circles but they are all the same size and colour. The triangular shapes must represent the bridge. Whatever Klee was thinking, these pictures work because he has used repetition of shape kept to a restricted colour palette.

This was not a difficult title - flower arrangers all have dozens of circle and spheres so synthesis of shape/form should not be a problem for any of us. Working with colour effectively with those forms, is the real challenge.

Can you see how cleverly Klee has used darker tones to create depth. The lighter and brighter shapes definitely come toward the viewer.

Another artist who played a lot with synthesising shape and colour was Kandinsky, so go and have a look at his work too. Kim Zimmerman


 

1ST - JILL HOSKIN ECFAA SA

The Judges comments : The cane frames with varied textural infills have been skilfully constructed. However, their sheer multitude seems overwhelming and makes the exhibit appear as a collection of shapes rather than a synthesis of form. The scattered and dotted flower placements lack visual scale, strength and cohesion in relation to the frames. Visual resting place(s) or areas of good dominance are absent. A black base would improve staging. (Kenyan judges)

An outstanding interpretation of the theme using a monochromatic colour scheme. This exhibit is neatly presented and 'technique' filled. The principles of design have been well considered. This piece has been executed with distinction and originality. (South African judges)


2ND - JENNIE YU  HONG KONG

The Judges comments : Splendid synthesis and juxtaposition of embedded dried plant material superbly accentuated by fresh. Lines, forms and patterns are subtly repeated throughout creating so much interest and fascination to glimpse into. The spiky material uplifts what could otherwise have been a visually heavy composition. Unusual staging leaves something to the imagination. (Kenyan judges)

A well executed atmospheric, contemporary design. Plant material is used and placed in a creative way. There is very subtle synthesis of form and colour but is it enough? The design lacks class value. (South African judges)


3RD  -  PRIYA SHAH KENYA

The Judges comments : An original design with a lot of effort to achieve repetition of form. It is beautifully executed to depict 'A Synthesis of Form and Colour'. The use of strelitzias in this piece works well to interpret the theme. The playful, rhythmic line throughout the design binds everything together in a pleasing way. A superior design with a great choice of components, good flair and creativity. (South African judges)

Interesting stringing of stacked triangular shapes and cork cones. However, it slings too sharply to the left upsetting visual balance. The predominantly downward facing shapes and cones appear to visually pull the composition to the base. Material with more ‘volume’ is needed to be placed at the right instead of the strelitzias at the left to improve balance. Interpretation is elusive. (Kenyan judges)


 

VERY HIGHLY COMMENDED - ANNE DALE GFU SA

The Judges comments : An extremely well-constructed and impressive design. The repetitive use of colour and form are excellent in depicting this class theme. This is an attractive exhibit with tidy textural components manipulated in a pleasing way. (South African judges)

Interesting technique of gluing bark pieces to the mesh. However, the equidistantly placed anthuriums tend to camouflage against it instead of creating a synthesis. The placement of cylinders at the left and the sphere at the right gives the effect of three separate concepts. (Kenyan judges)


HIGHLY COMMENDED - LENIE BEUKES WCAFA SA

The Judges comments : This design displays superb synthesis of stunning sculptural material rhythmically surrounding the urn-like container in a grand style. Natural, muted and sepia colours are well complemented by accents of fresh material. Unfortunately, the dried aloe spike whose placement detracts from the style, undesirably takes the eye upwardly out of the composition and imbalances the design to the left. (Kenyan judges)

An attractive exhibit with beautiful textural components. Repetition of organic forms is achieved as well as a synthesis of colour with the use of subtle development of this element throughout the design. The vertical top part of the design seems too weak for the much stronger bottom half of the design. (South African judges)

 

COMMENDED - MARIE DECKER CANADA

The Judges comments : A well-constructed design with good balance and repetition of lines, shapes, textures and colours. Overall, better synthesis of colour would have resulted if, rather than using black, white and gray/silver as separate colours, these had been used to create tints, tones and shades of the existing colours in the design. (South African judges)

An immaculately composed and staged exhibit with several 'artsy' touches. Inspired and rhythmic synthesis of shapes, forms, patterns and crisscrossed lines without congesting the space. Lively colour accents. Flower placements in central area lack visual strength. (Kenyan judges)

 

COMMENDED - NEVEEN SYED PAKISTAN

The Judges comments : The groundwork of the parallel style inner placement is well arranged and features several well synthesised forms. Wonderful plant material with good colour synthesis has been used. The inspired ‘surrounding’ with groovy shapes and curves create an 'artsy' vibe. More space between the alpinia foliage would improve the visual co-relation of the inner placement and the surrounding one. The angular shapes could be thicker and 'starry' material larger or grouped, for better scale.  (Kenyan judges)

A beautiful and well executed exhibit that very definitely interprets ' A Synthesis of Form and Colour'. The analogous colour theme and repetition of form is presented with distinction. It is a pity that the 'parallel' part of the design is not better incorporated into the design; it seems as if it has simply been added behind the structural part of the exhibit. (South African judges)

OTHER ENTRIES

NAHIDA RAZA PAKISTAN

RUKSANNA RATTANSEY PAKISTAN

MARIE CLAASSEN SA

FARHANA ANJUM PAKISTAN

MALCOLM KITT IRELAND

SHANDANA BANGASH PAKISTAN

WINKIE MARAIS SA

GRETA FOURIE SA

 

 

 

CLASS 4 - A DESIGN TO COMPLEMENT

A BOLDLY PATTERNED FABRIC

So, Class 4 fell into the new category, 'For Lovers of Pattern, Shape and Form' and I'm sure the judges would have been looking for all these elements in the designs in this class.

Thing is, competitors were challenged to include a boldly patterned fabric - and some people have got strange ideas about what 'boldly patterned' means. The picture below gives you an idea of what was expected - not a one coloured piece with a mild pattern that you had to put your reading glasses on to see. Not if you're from Africa, anyway! And there are no excuses, everyone - there are such glorious fabrics around - and if you don't want to buy a piece, just visit your scarf cupboard.

Competitors had to bear in mind that the fabric couldn't predominate in the design - so they had to be careful to choose something bright that could be cleverly displayed or draped in a subtle way or toned down by the use of suitably brighter plant materials.

And they had to give their design a title - so interpretation was also scored!!

It was a challenge!


1ST - LORRAINE ROSE WCAFA SA

THE BRIGHT SIDE OF LIFE

The Judges comments : Congratulations on a striking, well executed design that portrays the title perfectly. The colour impact is fabulous! It is very clever to have a hole in the centre of the design to minimise the bold pattern on the fabric and also highlight the beautiful plant materials. (South African judges)

A distinguished design, free from imperfection. All components are well balanced and in a perfect scale and proportion with each other. There is beautiful contrast of textures and forms. An excellent choice of plant material of bold colours complement the pattern of the fabric on the panel and create a strong harmony throughout the design. Great interpretation of the chosen title too. (Canadian judges)


 

2ND - RUPAL CHANDARIA KENYA

A BOLD TROPICAL DANCE

The Judges comments : A very neat and well presented piece. The way the fabric is incorporated into the design and the clever placement of the bark and hapene creates fabulous rhythm throughout. A slightly darker shade of pink anthurium would have given better impact and given this design even more 'wow' factor! (South African judges)

An interesting choice of plant materials and their delicate colours create a good harmony with the fabric colours and match and complement its pattern. Deliberately exciting rhythm has been achieved by using skilled techniques, effectively interpreting the title. The design is well balanced with very interesting use of positive and negative space. A little more contrast of forms or colour would create more interest in the whole design and would emphasise the area of dominance. The metal frame at the right top area could have been covered with fabric to finish the design. (Canadian judges)

3RD - ANN CRASTI AUSTRALIA

FLIGHT OF FANCY

The Judges comments : Well done on an original, creative design that complements the fabric so well. We commend you on the outstanding techniques used! (South African judges)

The design is well suited to its title and there is strong relationship between the structural components and the patterned fabric. Plant materials, well chosen for the interpretation, mimic the fabric. However, the chrysanthemums are too large and heavy. Their size and form dominate the design confusing the overall rhythm and movement. The grids are busy and out of scale with other design components. (Canadian judges)


VHC -  PRIYA SHAH KENYA

AFRICAN KITENGE

The Judges comments : A good interpretation of the title with exciting use of the chosen fabric. The design incorporates the patterns, shapes and colours on the fabric to create a visually striking piece. The placement of the large top circle creates a slight imbalance which could be rectified by moving it slightly to the left towards the centre of the design. (South African judges)

A distinguished design, free from imperfection. All components are well balanced and in a perfect scale and proportion with each other. There are lots of interesting contrasts of texture and form. An excellent choice of plant material with bold colours complements the fabric pattern and creates a strong sense of harmony throughout the design. Great interpretation of the title. (Canadian judges)


HC  -  SUNA MALHERBE OBU SA

THE POETRY OF LEAVES 

The Judges comments : Well done on an outstanding design that has been so well executed. The design complements the fabric beautifully and the painting of the foliage is sublime. (South African judges)

Unfortunately, the leaves appear to be getting totally lost in the fabric. Similar textures, colour, and forms make this design rather monotonous. (Canadian judges)

 

C - ALICIA KOWALCZYK AUSTRALIA

RAINBOW HEARTBEAT

The Judges comments : An original interpretation that complements the fabric. The placement of the plant material creates good rhythm and portrays the 'heartbeat' very well. Unfortunately, the base and rose stems detract from the overall design and the photo is a little fuzzy. (South African judges)

A novel design, both artistic and imaginative, displaying perfect interpretation of its title. An excellent choice of bright and bold fabric and use of plant material that complement each other. However, the bare stems and heavy black base seem disconnected from the the top of the design, almost dividing it in two. Maybe, covering test tubes and part of the rose stems with coloured raffia or fabric, would tie in and marry the top and bottom of the design. (Canadian judges)

 

DURBAN FLORAL ART CLUB MEMBER ENTRIES

ROSEMARIE BLAIR KZNAFA SA

FUN IN THE AFRICAN SUN

OTHER ENTRIES

KAREN FERREIRA  SA

BEHOLD THE ZEBRAS ON THE PLAINS

AND SHUDDER AT HIS MIGHTY MANES

AMOS RUDDEROW USA

BLUE SWIRLS

HARSHIDA SHAH KENYA

AFRICAN MAGIC

CRYSTAL TROJEK CANADA

SPRING IS IN THE AIR

SHAHIDA NAWAZ PAKISTAN

LILY LOVE

LIZ PRINGLE KZNAFA SA

PATTERN ON PATTERN

SUMINA HUMAYAN PAKISTAN

FOREVER

STEF BORCHARDS SA

GRACIOUS GREENS

DALENE GRUNDLINGH SA

LEAF SPLENDOUR

JANICE JENKINS CANADA

SPRING LEADS TO SUMMER

RINA-MARIA SCHEPERS SA

ISLAND DELIGHT

 

COBUS CONRADIE SA

VUVUZELA THUNDER

 

ANNIE NOMAN PAKISTAN

A DRAMATIC FUSION OF MOROCCAN

LEA ROMANOWSKI CANADA

PEACE THROUGH FLOWERS

ANJUM MUDDASSIR PAKISTAN

AN EXOTIC BLEND OF LAVENDER WITH CHUNRI

SHOBHNA KANTORIA KENYA

HARMONY WITH ANKURA

SUNITA KANORIA INDIA

FRAMED IT

PRITESH SHAH KENYA

KANGA AND CALABASH COUTURE

 

BARBARA BEDELL CANADE

MEMORIES OF JAIPUR

ANITA PATEL KENYA

SUNSHINE FLIGHT

FARZANA ANSARI PAKISTAN

SENSUAL

LIL TAGGART CANADA

CONNECTED MEMORY

GEETA SHAH KENYA

MOVIN TO THE GROOVIN

SUE FINGLETON AUSTRALIA

OPTIMAX

 

 

 

 

 

FOR LOVERS OF LINES

CLASS 3  -  CROSSHATCHED

This was the final class in 'For Lovers of Line' and if you chose 'Crosshatched', you had to 'crosshatch for your life!'. A simple grid here and there just 'didn't cut the mustard'. And one type of crosshatching just wasn't enough. And, weaving ain't crosshatching, incase you're wondering!! (So throwing in that woven structure you made 'when pa fell off the bus', didn't impress our some of our judges, I'm afraid.)

Also, if you did the necessary crosshatching, you ended up with an enormous amount of texture in your design which had to be toned down somehow with the introduction of smooth solids or open spaces.

To get a real feel for the power of cross hatching, one has to look at a lot of sketching. The drawings of the old masters are really worth a gander. (The picture below is by Leonaro da Vinci and there are many books of his sketches.) The way crosshatching adds value (darkness and light), depth and vitality to what they put on paper is amazing. And, we can use it just as well in floral art too. (I mean, in the old days, who hasn't covered up oasis with a wisp or two of crosshatched sisal. Ha Ha! We can certainly do a lot better than that now!) Kim Zimmerman

1ST  -  LEA ROMANOWSKI CANADA

The Judges comments : A well-balanced design with good line flow and well positioned Vanda orchids. Evidence of crosshatching and depth has been achieved with the reeds. (New Zealand judges)

A well conceived crosshatched construction with excellent mechanics. Good use of linear plant material of various thickness. Great choice of flowers with crosshatched patterns on them. A design of real distinction. (South African judges)


2ND  -  HENDRA GOUWS NFU SA

The Judges comments : A well-executed, imaginative design of great distinction. The placement of plant material of different colours and thicknesses throughout the design is excellent and adds dynamic inner crossing to depict the class theme. Well done! (South African judges)

Good depth achieved in the circle of crosshatching with a great rhythm of colour throughout - although some of the slimmer black sticks could have been used to better integrate the thick black sticks into the design. The orchids, though beautiful, are not strong in form so don't really give the eye a chance to rest or sufficiently balance out the thicker black stick work. This is a well staged contemporary design. However, the circle could have been placed a little higher for the visual weight of the base. (New Zealand judges)


3RD  -  YVONNE EIJLERS KZNAFA SA

The Judges comments : A strikingly neat, eye catching, dramatic design with distinction and a very high class value. A great example of 'less is more'. The crosshatching, even on the leaves, is very innovative. An exceptional container for this concept. (South African judges)

A sharp design with good textural contrasts. The bunch of berries could be tripled in size and extended down the container. The three beautiful leaves could be placed more horizontally to add depth. The crosshatched form contrasts well with the smooth container. A well- staged design. (New Zealand judges)


VHC  -  MARJOLIJN MALAN WCAFA SA

The Judges comments : A work of art indeed. Pleasing use of colours in a spectrum from light to dark, complementing the frame and background. The crosshatching on the aloe and the stapelia flowers are an added bonus to this pleasing exhibit. Well done. (South African judges)

There is good colour blending and good textural contrast in this design which is enclosed in a frame with crosshatched reeds. Attention does need to be paid to the condition of the frame. Beautiful rhythm has been achieved with the plant material placements. (New Zealand judges)

HC  -  JILL HOSKIN ECFAA SA

The Judges comments : A design of good proportions showing nice depth with the placement of the cyperus stems. The flowers are well positioned but the leaves would be better if they were placed one above the other closer to the lilies (rather than lying one on top of another on top of the curved component).The use of colour in this piece is extremely attractive and the different textures are appealing too. (New Zealand judges)

A successful interpretation which has been beautifully executed. However, the light green crosshatched 'screen' seems to be a second background: plant material is not incorporated into the screen and therefore the design lacks unity. (South African judges)

C  -  DALENE GRUNDLINGH WCAFA SA

The Judges comments :  A good choice of plant material for this class. Lovely crosshatching has been neatly achieved but the design lacks excitement and 'wow' factor. (South African judges)

A smartly staged design. The light reflecting on the bamboo gives it a smooth appearance to balance the rough textures of the twigs and tillandsia. (New Zealand judges)


C - MADHU SHAH AUSTRALIA

The Judges comments : There is no appearance of multiple crossing materials in this design. Good vertical line is achieved with the sticks, but the curved line has detracted from the overall character. Good repetition of plant material is evident and the design has been nicely staged on a Gregor Lersch inspired stand. (New Zealand judges)

An artistic design with good use of line and visible, varied crosshatching. Clever use of mechanics creates an almost soaring effect. Plant material has been placed in an interesting and contemporary way. However, the design lacks 'wow' factor. (South African judges) 


DURBAN FLORAL ART CLUB MEMBER ENTRIES

3RD  -  YVONNE EIJLERS KZNAFA SA

 

OTHER ENTRIES

ALTHEA HIGHAM WCAFA SA

ANN HARBORD CANADA

ANNAMARI CILLIERS SA

CARYS HARRISON UK

ELMIEN RAVENSCROFT SA

FARAH KHURSHEED PAKISTAN

GHEETA SHAH KENYA

HARSHIDA SHAH KENYA

JAYNA SHAH KENYA

MARIE CLAASSEN SA

MARIEKE RIC HANSEN KZNAFA SA

MARIEKE SMIT SA

MEI LENG HARPER CANADA

PAMELA GALLOWAY UK

PRAVINA SHAH KENYA

RAFIT ABID PAKISTAN

SAMEENA AZHAR PAKISTAN

 

 

CLASS 2  -  WHAT CAN FOUR LINES DO?

This class also fell under the category 'For Lovers of Line' so the focus had to be on four distinct lines and the art that could be produced with these.

It is quite a difficult process to find four (the most 'even of even' numbers in my mind and a number that rarely works in floral art) pieces of plant material/s that could be put together to make something that really speaks to viewers. However, I think there are some pretty good attempts in this section.

Just a couple of thoughts:

It really helped the judges if they could distinctly see the four lines in the design. Some competitors joined their lines together so well that they couldn't see where the different lines began and ended. So how did they know that four lines had actually been used?

Also, remember that a line has a distinct beginning and a distinct end. Once they join together, a shape results and the line is gone. Unfortunately, there were at least four brilliant designs that fell into this trap! A circle is not a line. A closed triangle is not a line either. You live and learn!

On each of our creative hands there are four lines which supposedly tell a lot about us (if you believe in that sort of thing!). Interestingly, they are called the head line, the heart line, the life line and the fate line and thinking about it, I do believe that one's head, heart, life and fate all determine the type of art one will create. Kim Zimmerman


1st - Farhana Azim Pakistan

The Judges comments : Wonderful strong plant materials create a striking use of lines, space and movement. The clarity of this design is commendable! Congratulations! (South African judges)

An immaculately balanced piece exhibiting excellent workmanship with the use of interesting plant materials to depict the class title in the most innovative manner. A fascinating display of foliage creating enchanting textured variety with a blend of different hues of green making it an absolute certain prize winner. (Indian judges)


2nd - Paula Monk Kznafa SA

The Judges comments : A remarkable interpretation. Art in plant material. A very clever piece. Congratulations. (South African judges)

An intense depiction of the show title creating a beautiful art piece with the use of interesting dried material. The textured background makes the design a visual treat. However, a little depth in the exhibit would have made it even more effective. (Indian judges)

 

3rd  -  Kath Shaw UK

The Judges comments : An alluringly constructed and staged exhibit accomplishing good use of space making it dramatic and a visual treat for the eye. Repetition of flowers or colour would have added to this well staged exhibit. (Indian judges)

Fascinating eucalyptus bark lines with good use made of space. The four lines are clean and concise. It must have been quite a mechanical challenge to put this together. A slight pity that the table isn't higher (to avoid the green backing) and the design a little further back. Well done! (South African judges)

 

VHC - Tabassam Pizvi Pakistan

The Judges comments : Great clarity of movement and good use of space. A really splendid piece! Had the base had been the same colour of the tablecloth, the design would be even more striking and ingeniously balanced. (South African judges)

This beautiful design giving the feel of a dancing lady depicts the class title, as well as the overall show title, very well. (Indian judges)

 

HC - Lea Romanowski Canada

The Judges comments : Lovely use of the dried streltzia leaves. The four lines (called for in the title) are well-spaced, utilising the stand in good proportion to the complete design. The leaves themselves lack the simple clarity expected. By painting the base the same colour as the table cloth, an exhibit with greater harmony would have resulted. (South African judges)

A very interesting depiction of the class title using only one type of plant material. The swirling leaves create a beautiful rhythm in the exhibit. A very well balanced and harmonious piece. However, adding a variety of texture would have made the design even more impressive. (Indian judges)


C - Annemari Cilliers Ecfaa SA

The Judges comments :Great movement has been achieved with the aspidistra leaves and the colour of the red leaf adds fabulous depth and blends well with the container. Perhaps the simplicity of the lines asked for in the title has been complicated by thicker leaf shapes - but they are lines, nonetheless! (South African judges)

This exhibit shows superb workmanship with the leaves creating a rhythmic and good interpretation of the class title. However, if the design was placed in a taller vase, it would have been even more impactful. (Indian judges)

 

DURBAN FLORAL ART CLUB MEMBER ENTRIES

 

CONGRATULATIONS TO  PAULA MONK KZNAFA SA  -  2ND

KEVIN WEBB KZNAFA SA

 

OTHER ENTRIES

 

DE-MARA BEZUIDENHOUT SA

FAIEZAH SHAHID PAKISTAN

FARAH KHURSHEED PAKISTAN

HELEN CUSACK IRELAND

HENRIETTE LOUW SA

JAN DE BEER SA

KATHLEEN LANG CANADA

 

LYN BAIRD KZNAFA SA

MARY-ANN VERCAMMEN CANADA

NAINA SHAH KENYA

 

NAVEEN SYED PAKISTAN

NUZHAT SAEED PAKISTAN

NAZLI ASIF PAKISTAN

PRATIBHA NEWARY KENYA

PRIYA SHAH KENYA

SALMA AANSARI PAKISTAN

SAMINA HUMAYUN PAKISTAN

SANDY LEE SA

SANDY VENTER SA

SHAKILA KHALIL PAKISTAN

VERENA BHENSON SA

ZEENAT SALIM PAKISTAN

 

 

CLASS 1  -  HORIZONTALLY INCLINED

This show was divided into categories and the first three classes fell under the section 'FOR LOVERS OF LINE'.

One of the ways we create art is by great use of line and when asked to concentrate on line, we have to focus on when a line stops being a line and becomes, instead, a shape or form.

Class One was called 'HORIZONTALLY INCLINED' and the schedule asked competitors to send their pictures in in landscape format. So, guess what? Several competitors didn't read that and found the tallest stand they could and elaborately put as many horizontal lines across it as they could and then took a photograph in portrait format which resulted in a penalty! (So sorry - but these virtual shows have very few rules that can be policed but asking for a landscape photograph is one of them.) We were asking you to keep your horizontal low, or, if you were going to put it on a stand, to keep it of short to moderate height.

The word 'Inclined' was added to the title for a reason and ignoring it entirely was perilous. Some competitors felt it was enough to just present a horizontal line but that extra word allowed you to play with the angle of your line a little. But, you didn't want to end up going diagonal because then you're just weren't really horizontal anymore!

Some competitors presented quite curvaceous lines and I'm on the fence as to what I feel about this. Is a 'lazy crescent' or slightly 'inverted crescent' still a horizontal? Hmmmm?

Can you believe that the lines below are all straight horizontals? They are! Optical illusions are pure craziness! Kim Zimmerman


1ST - VIBHA DODHIA  KENYA

The Judges comments : An excellent 'Horizontally Inclined' piece. The structure made of rolled and tatami-ed corrugated cardboard is inspired. The eye is ably to flow through this design with beautiful rhythm encountering areas of interest along the way. Very well done! (Kenyan judges)

An immaculately thought out design using minimalistic well chosen plant materials on a low unobtrusive stand. There are beautiful inclines to the front and back of the horizontal line. The design is superbly balanced. A stronger solid curving line, like a yellow-green flax, could add variety to the design. This is an example of an excellent landscape photograph. (South African judges.)


2ND  -  JACKIE THERON WCAFA SA

The Judges comments : Well done! A perfectly balanced 'Horizontally Inclined' design. Placing a bud of the strelitzia in between the flax at the front edge would have created continuity of line and colour. (Kenyan judges)

A different take on 'Horizontally Inclined'. A beautifully placed natural design. The container could have been lower, but then the success of the design wouldn’t be so apparent. (South African judges)

 

 

                   3RD MARELIE VAN SCHALKWYK GFU SA

The Judges comments Well done! This is a very cleverly presented design of neutral colours. The plant material is gorgeous. The title is well interpreted by the angle of the design. (Kenyan judges)

A stunning monochromatic design of broken and direct line. The photograph is taken at an interesting angle. However, the design is a straight horizontal and relies on the photograph to portray the 'Inclined' required by the title. (South African judges)

 

VERY HIGHLY COMMENDED - KATH SHAW UK

The Judges comments : A very well balanced horizontally inclined design. The cane creates excellent rhythm and creates good spatial areas within this piece. (Kenyan judges)

A lovely, peaceful, horizontally inclined design. The carton base with slight inclination is clever and incorporating dry material is very trendy right now. The lines connecting at one focal area hampers line direction a little. A placement of a longer single line ending in an upward motion would have created more excitement. (South African judges)


HIGHLY COMMENDED - MADHU SHAH AUSTRALIA

The Judges comments : What an exciting and interesting design with lots of horizontal line. Perhaps a stronger direct line like variegated flax would have made it even more beautiful. The inclusion of the decorative balls and small leafed foliage juxtaposed with the wonderful green anthuriums work well. The cane lines introduce the idea of 'Inclined'. (South African judges)

A good contemporary horizontal design. Unfortunately, it does not interpret the word 'Inclined'. (Kenyan judges)

 

COMMENDED - JEANETTE HABLUTZEL WCAFA SA

The Judges comments : A whimsical, magical natural design. A wonderful selection of moss branches and touches of wool add a softness of line to this design. A lower stand painted in the same background colour, placed at a flatter angle would have benefited this design. Stronger line plant material is needed for contrast. (South African judges)

A very interesting selection of plant material used to achieve this very flowing 'Horizontally Inclined' design. Unfortunately, the stand seems dominating. (Kenyan judges)


COMMENDED - KAREN O'FARRELL IRELAND

The Judges comments : A super exciting piece of art. The mass of crosshatched line gives a horizontally inclined shape but, unfortunately, the stand is dominant and makes the design static. Stronger linear material placed in a horizontal manner would have created more movement and line direction in this design. Very creative use of colour and objects is displayed in this design. (South African judges.)

This contemporary design is well 'inclined' in the open sided rectangular stand. Colour is used beautifully to create impact. Unfortunately, the stand looks dominating and makes the design static. (Kenyan judges)

 

DURBAN FLORAL ART CLUB MEMBER ENTRIES

KEVIN WEBB  SOUTH AFRICA

 

OTHER ENTRIES

Anila Hindocha
KENYA

 

 Barbara Smith   CANADA

 Fred du Preez  SOUTH AFRICA

Althea Higham  SOUTH AFRICA.

Dipty Somaia. KENYA.

 Dewald Vermaak. SOUTH AFRICA.

Judy Gray  SOUTH AFRICA

Annie Noman   PAKISTAN.

Jean Hancox   SOUTH AFRICA.

Jean Plaskett   UNITED KINGDOM.

Kathleen Lang   CANADA.

Sandra Williamson CANADA.

Anjum Muddassir   PAKISTAN

Lanny Pramana.  AUSTRALIA.

Liza Tustin.  SOUTH AFRICA.

Lea Romanowski.  CANADA.

Farah Khursheed.  PAKISTAN.

Sue Fingleton. AUSTRALIA.

Sameena Ahmed.  PAKISTAN.

Jayshree Agarwal   INDIA.

Malgosia Zapala. CANADA.

Michael Cordeiro.
AUSTRALIA

 

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